A day in the life of me and my son

November 29, 2016 Uncategorized 13 Comments

My son is now three and I still only have a handful of photos of me with him. I have been aware of this for some time and keep meaning to book a shoot with a professional photographer, but for one reason or another, haven't yet done so. This makes me feel so incredibly sad, as time is slipping by and he is growing up fast. Our times together are so precious, I know that he won’t remember many of these days and fear that he’ll only remember the times where I messed up. So this blog is a very small gift to my son, where I have tried to capture our typical day together, to show him how loved he is and the fun we had. The idea was to document our day with pictures, as I do for other families; however, trying to take selfies with a professional camera is not as easy at it sounds! Hence the scary picture below (not how I want to be remembered)!

flp-slide-portrait_0000s_0000_6u4a7826_0000s_0014_6u4a4129

Fairly unsuccessful selfie with one gorgeous little boy and his scary looking mummy!

My son and I generally start our day around 6am when he wakes up and once he’s had a series of things to eat we start to play. This nearly always involves making a train track and playing with trains, therefore I thought I’d try to take a selfie of us with the track. When it became apparent that this wasn't going to work, I took a picture of him so that I could at least document our activities.

flp-slide-portrait_0000s_0000_6u4a7826_0000s_0016_6u4a4126

Track build in progress; my favourite part of the game.

After we’d played trains, 'Frog Frenzie' (Hungry Hippos in the old days), cleared up the mess and hung out the washing, we scooted to our favourite café for something to eat (he scooted, I ran behind). One minute from the front door we had an emergency, his nail broke, so I had to quickly pull the clippers from my coat, trim the broken nail and check for any more potential breaks. As we were walking in the café, he explained to me that he wasn’t going to have breakfast or a babychino (that he always has) and that he was just going to have an ice lolly. When I informed him that he would not be having an ice lolly instead of food, especially in this cold weather, he was distraught and naturally cried as though someone had died. This is all before we had even arrived at the counter three steps from the front door. Having comforted him, checked that he really didn’t want a babychino and ordered breakfast, we sat down, got up again and ordered a babychino.  Breakfast arrived and I asked one of the staff to take a picture of us together, which he kindly did and I have to say, I was impressed with the result.

flp-slide-portrait_0000s_0000_6u4a7826_0000s_0012_6u4a4161

The trouble with asking children to pose for the camera, is that they may end up looking slightly bored! This picture is also not a true representation of our day. We're normally eating, talking, laughing, interacting.

From the café we took Thomas the Tank Engine to the playground where we made friends with another mummy and her little girl, who also kindly took a photo of us and I took one in return.

flp-slide-portrait_0000s_0000_6u4a7826_0000s_0011_6u4a4162

My son obviously responding like a typical three year old when asked to look at the camera for a nice picture with mummy. One of the reasons I shoot how I do, no posing required and more natural moments captured; like me squeezing through playground apparatus and whizzing down the slide with him.

flp-slide-portrait_0000s_0000_6u4a7826_0000s_0010_6u4a4196

My beautiful boy enjoying one of his favourite playground activities.

After the playground, we went into town to take my son's new coat back to the shop as I had bought a size too big and quite frankly, he didn't like it anyway. While there, I did a quick supermarket sweep and grabbed a handful of new tops for myself to try on, we squeezed into the changing room with his scooter and he was very patient while I quickly tried them on, commenting that the coat that was hanging up in the changing room looked like mine (it was). From there we went to the weekly market to buy our fruit and veg. I bribed him, with the promise of chocolate cake, to stand in front of the veg stall for another photo to be taken (and I’m so pleased I did).

flp-slide-portrait_0000s_0000_6u4a7826_0000s_0005_6u4a4208

Having dragged a heavy shopping trolley and a small child on a scooter for half an hour back from town, we stopped for a quick photo opportunity next to our regular bus stop. By this time I was slightly too tired to worry at all about composition or even to make sure that you could tell that it was the bus stop.

flp-slide-portrait_0000s_0000_6u4a7826_0000s_0004_6u4a4212

Once home my son was rewarded with his earlier bribe of chocolate cake and I was rewarded with a cup of tea and the pleasure of reading the tongue twister book by Dr Seuss, ‘Fox in Socks’, along with two other stories; before spending the next hour cooking dinner only to be told “I don’t like that” and getting down from the table. By this point my energy and motivation for taking pictures had definitely waned.

flp-slide-portrait_0000s_0000_6u4a7826_0000s_0003_6u4a4226

flp-slide-portrait_0000s_0000_6u4a7826_0000s_0002_6u4a4228

Having finished my meal, my boy joined me upstairs to change the sheets on our beds (his nappy had leaked in the night). This was promptly followed by a melt down of “I’m not tired” and “I don’t want a bath”, which was then followed by “I don’t want to get out of the bath” and “I don’t want to go to bed”, like it’s a really terrible thing to do. Once dressed and in bed, we read a couple more stories and I have no idea what time he went to sleep as I believe I was out before he was; fortunately for me this time, I managed to wake up again to enjoy an evening.

flp-slide-portrait_0000s_0000_6u4a7826_0000s_0000_6u4a4239

My son 'helping' change the sheets

So, while I’m fairly happy that I have more or less captured our typical day, my son still doesn’t have a decent shot of me with him. Pictures of us interacting. Pictures of me reading to him, wheeling him back from town, going down the slide with him, playing trains on the track and in the bath. All these normal things that we do everyday, but those little things that he won't remember. When I showed him the pictures of this day he said "But I can't see you though" and my  heart sank. When I recently showed him some pictures of him as a baby (at a festival) he said "did I go there with daddy?". I said, "no you went there with mummy and daddy, it's just that mummy took all the pictures". So, while not being in the pictures was an issue I was already aware of, hearing my son's comments really does make me sad, as he'll look back on a childhood with no memories of mummy when in fact we're incredibly close. Hence, my New Year's Resolution is going to be to get some 'day in the life' photos taken of our family, not only for me but for my son.